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What's Blooming 4.25.2017

Each day another shrub or tree is flushing out with blooms.

Some have huge blossoms which can't be missed.

Others give a pleasant discovery only on closer examination.

 

    Rhododendron 'Ken Janeck'                  Rhododendron 'Rim Fire'

 

        Dogwood 'Prairie Pink'                  Dogwood 'Prairie Pink' close up

 

    Dogwood 'Eddie's Wonder'             Lilac 'Pink Perfume Boomerang'™

 

          Azalea 'Ben Morrison'                       Barberry 'Golden Ruby'

Azalea Lace Bug, Prevention is the Best Solution

Azalea lace bug, Stephanitis pyroides, has been damaging Rhododendons and Azaleas for

Lace Bug Damage
Image provided by Gardeningknowhow.com

the past several years. Severe damage by the insects make azaleas look snow white. It also affects Rhododendrons. The bug sucks out the chlorophyll from the leaves. If not controlled, the azalea weakens, drops its leaves, can no longer produce energy, and eventually dies.

It is essential that the plant is treated before or in the early stages of infestation. Once leaf damage occurs, the tissue is dead and must be removed. If your plant is fully affected and needs trimming, what would be left?

Nymphs hatch in the spring and begin feeding on the underside of the leaves. By mid summer the adults lay their eggs. Several generations may develop in one year with the final eggs overwintering.

Signs of Lace Bugs
Image provided by OSU

A gardener has several choices. Some actions would need to be repeated, but it is not recommended using all methods at the same time.

 

 

 

  • Make sure your azalea is planted in the right area, is well watered and regularly fertilized.
  • Spray horticultural oils on the underside of the leaves to smother the eggs.
  • Use insecticidal soap at the nymph stage.
  • Use Neem oil to disturb their growth and nervous system.
  • Use insecticides to spray directly on the insect.
  • Use a systemic as a preventative. We carry Bonide Annual Tree and Shrub as well as Bonide Rose Care Rx systemic insecticide. These are easy to apply, no spraying necessary and work quite well. The optimum time to use this is while the plant is actively growing.

By being proactive and regularly examining your azaleas and rhododendrons, you can fight any early infestations of the azalea lacebug. They are typically active between April 15th to July 4th, so now is the time to act, especially if your plants were affected last year. Walk around to see if it has arrived in your neighborhood. Bugs don't recognize property lines and could soon be coming your way.

Excellent information and photos can be found here

 

Spring Garden: Garden Buddies 2017

Botanists are scientists who study plants.

 

Join us as we become botanists.  We'll discover how a seed wakes up in the spring by dissecting some pumpkin seeds - both unsprouted and sprouted.
We'll follow the life cycle of a pumpkin plant from sprout to jack-o-lantern.
Have fun getting our fingers in the soil when we conduct our own botanical experiment by planting a pumpkin patch here with both starts and seeds.                                                Which do you think will grow faster or stronger?
AND, you'll take pumpkin plant starts and seeds home to do your own experiment in your own garden.

 

  What: Spring Garden

  When: Saturday, May 15th @10AM

  Where: Farmington Gardens

               21815 SW Farmington Road,

                Beaverton OR 97007

  Cost: $5  Please REGISTER

  Phone: 503.649.4568

  Email: events@farmingtongardens.com

Late Spring Vegetable Gardening with Jenny 2017

You might have your 'cool' season crops in and growing. Maybe you have started seeds inside or maybe you haven't even started your vegetable garden yet.                No worries.

Jenny will review soil preparation and plant spacing. She will also answer questions like...

  • How close can tomatoes be planted to beans? Do they have special needs?
  • How do you 'harden off' your seedlings so they are ready to plant once the optimum soil temperatures have been reached. And what are those temperatures for the 'warm' season crops?
  • Can herbs, flowers and vegetables be mixed together? Or grown in pots?

Bring your own questions about fertilizing, mulching and diseases so you can have the best season ever!

 

 What:   Late Spring Vegetable Gardening

 When:  Saturday, May 6th @11AM and repeated

              Monday, May 8th @11AM

 Where: Farmington Gardens

               21815 SW Farmington Road,

               Beaverton OR 97007

 Cost:     FREE but please register

 Phone:  503.649.4568

 Email:   events@farmingtongardens.com

What's Blooming 4.03.2017

The blossoms of fruit trees and flowering ornamentals are equally attractive in the garden.

                     Jack Flowering Pear                                Cherry 'Black Tartarian'

               Blueberry 'Bountiful Blue'                                Blueberry 'Northcountry'

                Azalea 'Hino Crimson'                               Pieris japonica 'Passion'

     Mahonia aquifolia - Oregon Grape                        Rhododendron 'Ramapo'

Staghorn Ferns: Build a Unique Mounted Display

   

 

 

Staghorn ferns naturally live on tree branches and stones- no soil needed!

You can grow and display one of these unique and popular plants in your home.

   Join us for this Hands-On class!

You choose the staghorn fern and mounting style. We'll take you step-by-step to creating a finished piece of living art.

All materials and care instructions supplied.

 

 

 

   What: The Care and Mounting of Staghorn Ferns

   When:  Saturday, April 29th, 2017 11AM

   Where: 21815 SW Farmington Road,

                 Beaverton 97007

  Cost:    Staghorn plant and all materials $20.

               Registration requested by phone or email

  Email: events@farmingtongardens.com

  Phone: 503.649.4568

Organic Gardening for Spring

Want your garden to be without a doubt 100% organic and GMO free? Join us in learning how Randy and his company goes above and beyond to give you a product that will help you to do just that. You've heard about compost before, but do you really know what it means? More importantly, do you really know what wonders it can do for your soil and in turn your plants?

Join us as we learn from Randy, the co-founder of Malibu Compost. He is passionate about what we put into our soil and environment. His company does more than any other to ensure their product is the cleanest and truly organic.

This class will focus on soil testing, integrated pest management, and transitioning and sustaining an organic garden.

What: Organic Spring Gardening Class

When: Saturday April 8th from 11am to 12pm

Where: Farmington Gardens

Cost: Free but please call or email us to register

Email: events@farmingtongardens.com

Phone: 503 649 4568

Terrarium Workshop

It seems terrariums are everywhere! They are so trendy and it’s easy to see why. Having a bit of green hanging out on an end table or some unique succulents on a bathroom counter is such a great way to bring life to an otherwise stagnant spot.

Ferns and mosses thrive in humid environments. Succulents thrive on little care. Both have so many different colorful and unique varieties. Come see how easy it is and create your own Terrarium. You’ll have fun creating a combination uniquely your own with our large,  affordable selection of glass terrariums as well as properly sized plants to fill it with.

Exbury Azalea

If you’re looking for a showy, deciduous, spring-flowering plant, try an Exbury Azalea!

Exbury Azaleas are one group among several varieties of deciduous azaleas belonging to the Rhododendron genus. Other deciduous azalea groups include the Northern Light Series,

Klondyke Azalea

Image Provided by Monrovia

Arneson, Mossman, Girard, and Weston.

The development of Exbury Hybrid azaleas was accomplished in the late 1800's through a succession of cross-breeding of both native U.S. and Asian varieties.

Exbury hybrids are upright shrubs that normally grow from 4 to 6 feet tall and about 4 to 5 feet in width. They bloom in late spring or early summer, producing clusters of 7-18 large, 2"-3", often very fragrant, often bi-colored flowers in shades of yellow, orange, pink, red and white.
In the fall, the foliage of Exbury Azaleas turns red, maroon, orange or golden yellow.

Easter Egg Hunt 2017

Look who will be here for your enjoyment!

 Nothing Bundt Cakes and The Coffee Bus

       

Such a great way to start your day!